Free Food: It Lures Us Everywhere


11/13

“Come to this event! FREE FOOD!”

This is a typical sign seen around all college campuses. Student organizations are always luring people into events with the promise of free food. What is it about food that brings flocks of people to events that they never would have visited otherwise?

I surveyed a large number of students from a variety of campuses around the U.S. regarding the important coalition between student organizations and food.

Food has always been a binding experience, but in college it becomes more than just that: “Everyone has to eat, but not everyone grows up eating the same things. I think in that way eating really plays into the idea of what college is promoted as being; a learning experience where you are expected to grow as a person. What better way to broaden yourself than with food?” said Gus Merwin, a student at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point.

Many students that I talked to echoed this sentiment. Food has the power to bring unique people together in a setting where they are comfortable sharing their ideas and opinions. Great food has the power to even transcend a good conversation; it has the power to create lasting impressions.  Everyone needs to eat; why not eat together around delicious food?

Along with good conversation, food also holds the ability to further your career. Student organizations on campuses often hold events that provide possibilities of career building, and there’s no greater way to start networking with someone than talking about food. Students that I talked to often talked about how they’ve discovered many networking opportunities whenever an event holds food. Food is the perfect conversation starter when trying to start a beneficial acquaintanceship in your field.

Through my surveys and interviews, I compiled data on the importance and power of food when it’s paired with student organizations:

See the data and the article published in College & Cook Magazine

Bringing Greece Home: My Culinary Quest


2/12/13

I spent last summer riding ferries over turquoise waters and buses over rolling hills. I hiked to ancient theatres and temples on seaside cliffs, and rode donkeys down to hot springs. Most importantly, I tasted beautiful mixtures of spinach and feta pies paired perfectly with aged wine–I tasted the Mediterranean and fell in love.

Through the study abroad program at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, I had the irreplaceable experience to study culinary journalism in Greece.

And through all these experiences I realized that the cuisine truly reflects the simple tradition and rich history of the land and its people.

This was increasingly apparent when I arrived on the peace Greek island of Kea.  There I had the opportunity to visit Agalia Kremezi ‘s culinary school. Kremezi is a former journalist turned cookbook author that holds her school at her vine and flower covered home.  There I learned how to make stuffed  grape leaves,  herb flat bread, and paper-thin phyllo dough, and I learned that no meal is complete with a wine glass that is anything less than half full. The food we made was very traditional. Most of the ingredients used were straight from Kremezi’s garden or from other local farmers.  It allowed you to taste the true flavors of the land and experience the culture of the people around you, making it a genuine food experience.

Genuine food is hard to find in America. Fast food is uncommon in Greece, only making its presence known in large cities such as Athens.  In the States, go out to eat because we’re lazy and want to save time. In Greece, they go out to eat to have rich conversations and savor every bite.

But then as soon as it started, the trip was over and I was back in America. And the first thing that greeted me? A McDonald’s in the airport. After spending time in a country that prided itself on local flavors and culture, I was back in a society that cares too much about the cheapest and the fastest.

I also started to suffer from something I think is common for most who go abroad. I started having withdrawals from the flavors I once experienced on a daily basis. I was soon craving feta and baklava like no other, but I had nowhere to go to find them. It was up to me to bring what I learned from Greece back to America, which is easier said than done. However, I managed to recreate, to the best of my abilities the food that I learned to love in Greece back in my college kitchen (and budget).

For the article and recipes go to: http://www.collegeandcook.com/

When Gastroparesis Got Between Me and Doughnuts


10/30/12

There is one thing you need to know about me: I love doughnuts. I am in love with doughnuts. If a doughnut asked me to marry it right this second, I would not hesitate to say yes.  So when that all had to change, when I had to break up with doughnuts; I wasn’t the happiest person in the world.

It came out of nowhere and all of a sudden, BAM! I couldn’t eat anymore. I just physically couldn’t swallow. After a whole slew of tests, the doctors finally diagnosed me with gastroparesis.

According to Clinical Professor of Gastroenterology & Hepatology at the Stanford School of Medicine, George Triadafilopoulos, gastroparesis is a “severe delay in gastric emptying associated with more severe symptoms of vomiting and loss of appetite.” Getting this disease forces you to change your whole diet. Your body rejects certain types of food, causing nausea and vomiting, heartburn, and chest/stomach pain.

“Fats and fiber tend to retard emptying…this should be stressed as many of these patients…also have constipation, [and] have been told to take fiber supplementation,” Triadafilopoulos said.

There is no swelling or itchiness as result of eating foods such as fiber, so it’s not an allergic reaction, but your awareness of food increases the same way it would if you had just found out you were allergic to peanuts or shellfish.

“Gastroapressis is an increasingly recognized disorder,” Triadafilopoulos said. There has been an increase of 158% of reported cases between 1995 and 2004.

Due to the fact that food takes longer to digest, I not only had to watch what I was eating, but I had to change the way in which I was eating it. Eating three large meals a day is often too much food to take in at one time. Instead, it’s wise to have four-five small meals a day. Having gastroparesis certainly doesn’t mean that you have to starve; it just means that you spread out the time in which you eat food. I had a few years of experience controlling my diet before I went to college—a place where your only meal plan choices seem to be greasy pizza or a sketchy sub sandwich.

“The management of gastroparesis in college students is challenging,” Triadafilopoulos said.

So how does one remain healthy and still eat while on the meal plan?

Granted, that answer varies depending on your college and their dining services, but the best thing to do (if you can) is to forget the meal plan, or get the smallest one available and to start cooking for yourself. Cook foods that are low in fat and fiber. Skip the midnight McDonalds run, and (as much as it pains me to say this) avoid doughnuts as much as possible.

There is one thing you need to know about me: I love doughnuts. I am in love with doughnuts. If a doughnut asked me to marry it right this second, I would not hesitate to say yes.  So when that all had to change, when I had to break up with doughnuts; I wasn’t the happiest person in the world.

It came out of nowhere and all of a sudden, BAM! I couldn’t eat anymore. I just physically couldn’t swallow. After a whole slew of tests, the doctors finally diagnosed me with gastroparesis.

According to Clinical Professor of Gastroenterology & Hepatology at the Stanford School of Medicine, George Triadafilopoulos, gastroparesis is a “severe delay in gastric emptying associated with more severe symptoms of vomiting and loss of appetite.” Getting this disease forces you to change your whole diet. Your body rejects certain types of food, causing nausea and vomiting, heartburn, and chest/stomach pain.

“Fats and fiber tend to retard emptying…this should be stressed as many of these patients…also have constipation, [and] have been told to take fiber supplementation,” Triadafilopoulos said.

There is no swelling or itchiness as result of eating foods such as fiber, so it’s not an allergic reaction, but your awareness of food increases the same way it would if you had just found out you were allergic to peanuts or shellfish.

“Gastroapressis is an increasingly recognized disorder,” Triadafilopoulos said. There has been an increase of 158% of reported cases between 1995 and 2004.

Due to the fact that food takes longer to digest, I not only had to watch what I was eating, but I had to change the way in which I was eating it. Eating three large meals a day is often too much food to take in at one time. Instead, it’s wise to have four-five small meals a day. Having gastroparesis certainly doesn’t mean that you have to starve; it just means that you spread out the time in which you eat food. I had a few years of experience controlling my diet before I went to college—a place where your only meal plan choices seem to be greasy pizza or a sketchy sub sandwich.

“The management of gastroparesis in college students is challenging,” Triadafilopoulos said.

So how does one remain healthy and still eat while on the meal plan?

Granted, that answer varies depending on your college and their dining services, but the best thing to do (if you can) is to forget the meal plan, or get the smallest one available and to start cooking for yourself. Cook foods that are low in fat and fiber. Skip the midnight McDonalds run, and (as much as it pains me to say this) avoid doughnuts as much as possible.

Helpful Tips:

Run Away From:

-carbonated drinks

-fried food

-high fibered food (oatmeal, apples, grain breads)

Instead Eat:
-Yogurt

-Soups, or anything that is more liquid based

-cooked vegetables that are low in fiber (squash, potatoes, spinach)

-Eggs

 

Home remedies for nausea:

-ginger (fresh, candied, or in drinks such as ginger ale or tea)

-Yogurt

-Eat slowly and drink a lot of water with each meal

-Lemon

 

article here: http://issuu.com/collegeandcook/docs/fall_issue_final?mode=window&backgroundColor=%23222222