Have early morning classes? Start your own breakfast ritual–USA Today


4/29/2014

“Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.” We’ve hear this from parents, teachers, doctors and cereal box-donning Olympians.

All too often, though, I talk to people who tell me they never eat breakfast.

Well, guess what? Our parents & teachers were right—breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Due to a crunch for time, laziness and/or lack of appetite in the wee hours of the morning, we miss out on the MIMOFTD, deeming it unessential.

But breakfast is essential; we get our energy and the nutrients we need from breakfast. If you don’t eat breakfast you’re skipping out on more than just a meal.

Luckily for me, I’m like Leslie Knope from Parks and Recreation: I worship breakfast (specifically waffles and pancakes). If I could eat breakfast food for every meal of the day, I totally would (and definitely have in the past…brinner time!).

Because I hold breakfast so dear, I make it a priority & wake up an hour before I have to do anything. I literally roll out of bed each morning and, like a zombie, find my way to the coffee pot, a.k.a. my lifeline.

After access caffeine, I pour myself a glass of orange juice, a bowl of cereal & butter up a piece of toast. I spend the next 20 minutes eating, drinking and watching the sun rise. Yes, this sounds cheesy, but I need this time. I need this morning routine to charge me up for the rest of the day. We all do.

Don’t have 20 minutes? That’s no excuse. Whether you have two minutes or two hours each morning, here are some morning rituals and routines that you can adopt to ensure that you are getting your most important meal every day — no matter your schedule.

0 minutes- Just because you have zero minutes to eat breakfast doesn’t mean you shouldn’t eat breakfast. In fact, if your day is starting out this hectic, then you’re definitely going to need that boost of energy. So, make breakfast the night before that you can just grab on your way out the door. Try baking some banana, zucchini or oatmeal muffins or homemade granola bars.

3 minutes- I know being addicted to coffee isn’t the greatest thing. But what if you need an energy fix and have three minutes to get it? There’s no need to wait in the coffee shop drive-thru.  Make yourself a cup of tea to-go. Try Earl Grey (which has a ton of caffeine, but more nutrients than coffee) or yerba mate, which gives you a heightened sense of awareness without the caffeine.

5 minutes– Yogurt. Start your day off great with a little yogurt. Yogurt is a quick, filling snack that boosts your immune system and is a great source of morning protein. Better yet, top it off with some granola or cereal. 

10 minutes- Sit down with a bowl of oatmeal or cereal.

20 minutes- Adopt my morning routine; it’s worked out pretty well for me. If you’re feeling ambitious, make a smoothie instead.

20+ minutes- Treat Yo’ Self to some waffles or pancakes with eggs. If you want something a little more healthy like a breakfast burrito.

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Bringing Greece Home: My Culinary Quest


2/12/13

I spent last summer riding ferries over turquoise waters and buses over rolling hills. I hiked to ancient theatres and temples on seaside cliffs, and rode donkeys down to hot springs. Most importantly, I tasted beautiful mixtures of spinach and feta pies paired perfectly with aged wine–I tasted the Mediterranean and fell in love.

Through the study abroad program at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, I had the irreplaceable experience to study culinary journalism in Greece.

And through all these experiences I realized that the cuisine truly reflects the simple tradition and rich history of the land and its people.

This was increasingly apparent when I arrived on the peace Greek island of Kea.  There I had the opportunity to visit Agalia Kremezi ‘s culinary school. Kremezi is a former journalist turned cookbook author that holds her school at her vine and flower covered home.  There I learned how to make stuffed  grape leaves,  herb flat bread, and paper-thin phyllo dough, and I learned that no meal is complete with a wine glass that is anything less than half full. The food we made was very traditional. Most of the ingredients used were straight from Kremezi’s garden or from other local farmers.  It allowed you to taste the true flavors of the land and experience the culture of the people around you, making it a genuine food experience.

Genuine food is hard to find in America. Fast food is uncommon in Greece, only making its presence known in large cities such as Athens.  In the States, go out to eat because we’re lazy and want to save time. In Greece, they go out to eat to have rich conversations and savor every bite.

But then as soon as it started, the trip was over and I was back in America. And the first thing that greeted me? A McDonald’s in the airport. After spending time in a country that prided itself on local flavors and culture, I was back in a society that cares too much about the cheapest and the fastest.

I also started to suffer from something I think is common for most who go abroad. I started having withdrawals from the flavors I once experienced on a daily basis. I was soon craving feta and baklava like no other, but I had nowhere to go to find them. It was up to me to bring what I learned from Greece back to America, which is easier said than done. However, I managed to recreate, to the best of my abilities the food that I learned to love in Greece back in my college kitchen (and budget).

For the article and recipes go to: http://www.collegeandcook.com/

When Gastroparesis Got Between Me and Doughnuts


10/30/12

There is one thing you need to know about me: I love doughnuts. I am in love with doughnuts. If a doughnut asked me to marry it right this second, I would not hesitate to say yes.  So when that all had to change, when I had to break up with doughnuts; I wasn’t the happiest person in the world.

It came out of nowhere and all of a sudden, BAM! I couldn’t eat anymore. I just physically couldn’t swallow. After a whole slew of tests, the doctors finally diagnosed me with gastroparesis.

According to Clinical Professor of Gastroenterology & Hepatology at the Stanford School of Medicine, George Triadafilopoulos, gastroparesis is a “severe delay in gastric emptying associated with more severe symptoms of vomiting and loss of appetite.” Getting this disease forces you to change your whole diet. Your body rejects certain types of food, causing nausea and vomiting, heartburn, and chest/stomach pain.

“Fats and fiber tend to retard emptying…this should be stressed as many of these patients…also have constipation, [and] have been told to take fiber supplementation,” Triadafilopoulos said.

There is no swelling or itchiness as result of eating foods such as fiber, so it’s not an allergic reaction, but your awareness of food increases the same way it would if you had just found out you were allergic to peanuts or shellfish.

“Gastroapressis is an increasingly recognized disorder,” Triadafilopoulos said. There has been an increase of 158% of reported cases between 1995 and 2004.

Due to the fact that food takes longer to digest, I not only had to watch what I was eating, but I had to change the way in which I was eating it. Eating three large meals a day is often too much food to take in at one time. Instead, it’s wise to have four-five small meals a day. Having gastroparesis certainly doesn’t mean that you have to starve; it just means that you spread out the time in which you eat food. I had a few years of experience controlling my diet before I went to college—a place where your only meal plan choices seem to be greasy pizza or a sketchy sub sandwich.

“The management of gastroparesis in college students is challenging,” Triadafilopoulos said.

So how does one remain healthy and still eat while on the meal plan?

Granted, that answer varies depending on your college and their dining services, but the best thing to do (if you can) is to forget the meal plan, or get the smallest one available and to start cooking for yourself. Cook foods that are low in fat and fiber. Skip the midnight McDonalds run, and (as much as it pains me to say this) avoid doughnuts as much as possible.

There is one thing you need to know about me: I love doughnuts. I am in love with doughnuts. If a doughnut asked me to marry it right this second, I would not hesitate to say yes.  So when that all had to change, when I had to break up with doughnuts; I wasn’t the happiest person in the world.

It came out of nowhere and all of a sudden, BAM! I couldn’t eat anymore. I just physically couldn’t swallow. After a whole slew of tests, the doctors finally diagnosed me with gastroparesis.

According to Clinical Professor of Gastroenterology & Hepatology at the Stanford School of Medicine, George Triadafilopoulos, gastroparesis is a “severe delay in gastric emptying associated with more severe symptoms of vomiting and loss of appetite.” Getting this disease forces you to change your whole diet. Your body rejects certain types of food, causing nausea and vomiting, heartburn, and chest/stomach pain.

“Fats and fiber tend to retard emptying…this should be stressed as many of these patients…also have constipation, [and] have been told to take fiber supplementation,” Triadafilopoulos said.

There is no swelling or itchiness as result of eating foods such as fiber, so it’s not an allergic reaction, but your awareness of food increases the same way it would if you had just found out you were allergic to peanuts or shellfish.

“Gastroapressis is an increasingly recognized disorder,” Triadafilopoulos said. There has been an increase of 158% of reported cases between 1995 and 2004.

Due to the fact that food takes longer to digest, I not only had to watch what I was eating, but I had to change the way in which I was eating it. Eating three large meals a day is often too much food to take in at one time. Instead, it’s wise to have four-five small meals a day. Having gastroparesis certainly doesn’t mean that you have to starve; it just means that you spread out the time in which you eat food. I had a few years of experience controlling my diet before I went to college—a place where your only meal plan choices seem to be greasy pizza or a sketchy sub sandwich.

“The management of gastroparesis in college students is challenging,” Triadafilopoulos said.

So how does one remain healthy and still eat while on the meal plan?

Granted, that answer varies depending on your college and their dining services, but the best thing to do (if you can) is to forget the meal plan, or get the smallest one available and to start cooking for yourself. Cook foods that are low in fat and fiber. Skip the midnight McDonalds run, and (as much as it pains me to say this) avoid doughnuts as much as possible.

Helpful Tips:

Run Away From:

-carbonated drinks

-fried food

-high fibered food (oatmeal, apples, grain breads)

Instead Eat:
-Yogurt

-Soups, or anything that is more liquid based

-cooked vegetables that are low in fiber (squash, potatoes, spinach)

-Eggs

 

Home remedies for nausea:

-ginger (fresh, candied, or in drinks such as ginger ale or tea)

-Yogurt

-Eat slowly and drink a lot of water with each meal

-Lemon

 

article here: http://issuu.com/collegeandcook/docs/fall_issue_final?mode=window&backgroundColor=%23222222

Food Challenges: The Bad & the Ugly


10/30/12

“I double-dog dare you!”

As kids, we used to dare each other to stick our tongues against frozen poles or to sing “I’m a Little Teapot” in front of all our friends. Now that we’re in college, we’re daring each other to do food challenges and to post the happenings on YouTube.

Many college students do food challenges that involve chugging a gallon of milk in under an hour or stuffing six saltines in your mouth at once. However, the most popular food challenge is the cinnamon challenge in which one has to eat a spoonful of cinnamon. Sounds easy, right?  But what do these food challenges actually do your body?

Jeremy Ertl, a student at Winona State University, like many others, thought that the cinnamon challenge couldn’t be that terrible.

“It looked fun and I wanted to see if it was really that bad,” Ertl said.

It really was.

“It was like trying to swallow sand. Just super dry, almost the sensation of choking. It makes it almost impossible to swallow,” Ertl said.

The cinnamon challenge has negative effects on your body, according to Professor Arlene Spark, a Professor of nutrition at the City University of New York.

“When dry and concentrated it [cinnamon] can cause burning and irritation of the mouth and perhaps also the esophagus,” Spark said.

Other food challenges have negative effects on a person’s body, which is why in most cases; the body rejects the food, such as in the milk challenge.

“The body cannot produce enough lactase (enzyme) to digest the sugar contained in milk (lactose) which will likely lead to gas, cramps and diarrhea,” Spark said.

Although there are obvious negative short-term effects that these challenges have on the body, there are no proven long-term health effects associated with them, according to Spark. Ertl said that a few minutes after  the challenge, he felt back to normal.

“Never let the Internet convince you to try something,” Ertl said. However, if you do feel the need to try anything once, Ertl said, “If you try it, do it with a friend. Makes the pain worth it for the laughter.”

http://issuu.com/collegeandcook/docs/fall_issue_final?mode=window&backgroundColor=%23222222